The Edge of Texas 2017 Lineup Announced

2017 marks the first annual Texas Monthly The Edge of Texas. Based off the May 2017 issue, this event is what I like to think of as a all-Texas SXSW in the middle of the Autumn season up in Dallas, TX.

The Edge of Texas will be held on November 10th and 11th, with each day holding a different theme. Friday, November 10 will be “Party on the Edge” at the Fashion Industry Gallery. Think great food, great music and great art as you and your fellow Texans celebrate everything art, fashion, and food.

Saturday is split into two themes. The day events (10 AM-4PM) is “Storytelling on the Edge”. Your favorite Texas Monthly writers and editors will be interviewing various speakers, allowing their stories to come alive from the pages of the mag. Topics vary from medicine to ISIS to movies to magicians to murder! The night portion begins at 7 PM with live cooking and a “futuristic campfire”. The night is finished off with musical performances by Shinyribs, a local Austinite band (“I Got Your Medicine“) and Sarah Jaffe, who is from Denton (“Clementine“, “Bad Baby“).

To see ticket information, the full lineup and the schedule, check out www.edge.texasmonthly.com.

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Graffiti Park (Castle Hill) – ATX

 

 

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The entrance to HOPE Outdoor Gallery/Graffiti Park/Castle Hill/King’s Hill

This place is known by many names. Google calls it HOPE Outdoor Gallery, but it’s also known as Castle Hill, Graffiti Park, and, I recently learned, King’s Hill (I think that’s a new Austinite thing). I call it Graffiti Park because it’s the most self-explanatory.

The last time I went to Graffiti Park was Spring 2014 as part of a “ultimate downtown ATX excursion” with a large group of folks from high school. My friend John has never been so I figured it would be a great time to re-explore the park during the Labor Day weekend.

Helpful advice: Graffiti Park is one of the most colorful places you will find in Austin. Also one of the most packed when it comes to parking. The park does not have an official parking lot and the surrounding shops are strict with their “Tow Away” zones, so that leaves parallel parking on the side streets. If you can get their via Metro or your own two feet, I would recommend it.

Took a few-okay more than a few-pictures of the park, which you can find below. You’ll notice the park is layered. There is no concrete sidewalk to hike up to get to the top level, so I would also recommend you wear sneakers or comfortable flip flops and not fancy boots. I saw a few of those and couldn’t help but cringe. I would describe more about the park, but I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves. 🙂

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If you are ever in Austin, this is a great spot to check out, especially when it’s not 100 degrees out.

HOPE Outdoor Gallery is located at 1101 Baylor St, Austin, TX 78703.

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Zelly & Ol' Hem's Graffiti
“Follow Zelly & Ol’ Hem’s” 🙂

Poetry Games: Louis Armstrong

"Hello, Dolly!"
Why are you such in a folly?
Darlin' quit your shenanigans
And come see "La vie en rose".
Stop and look around you 'cuz
We got "All the Time in the World"!

Darlin' Dolly you're a silly girl
Wanting to dance "Cheek to cheek"
In the rain on "Blueberry Hill".
The world lights up "When You're Smiling" and "What a Wonderful World" that is!

Come with us, come with me,
Give me "a kiss to build
a dream on".
Everything will fine because
"Nobody knows the trouble
I've seen" (except for those
"Jeepers Creepers" at "St. James infirmary!).

Hun, let's be real.
You ain't "On the Sunny Side
of the Street".
So quit your "Muskrat Ramble"
And go back to your
"Rockin' chair".
You've had your chance
To come to the rain to dance.
Face the truth and
All that comes with it.
Hun, you ain't "That Lucky
Old Sun" anymore.
You'll just have to settle and
"Dream a little dream of me".

“Meet the Young Roses: The Next Generation of Socially Conscious Socialites” – Vogue, June 2017

It’s that time again. The office around you grows quiet. People are “this can wait until Monday” slow to respond to your emails and phone calls. You just finished your sandwich with a side of fresh fruit and you begin to feel the heaviness in your eyes, trying to fight it before your brain screams to run to the nearest coffee shop. Time pretty much comes to a halt as you beg and plead with the Time gods to make 5 o’clock (or 4 if you have a state-wide rot rally coming to your area of town and causing traffic jams that forces you out of the office early, like me). Yes, it’s the dreaded (or anticipated) Friday afternoon.

I always like to spend at least a tid-bit of time on myself to keep me motivating and not looking at numbers all day. I will go out and take a walk, doodle or catch up on my reading. Since I forgot my copy of Anna Karenina (on the list for the “30 in 3” Book Challenge), I have escaped to my favorite place in the world: Vogue. 

Since I have already read the June 2017 story on Elle Fanning (a beautiful piece that makes you want to be BFFs with Elle), it was time to venture down the list. My eye caught the article titled above. My dream is to be a self-made New York socialite (the casual “nerdy/dorky is cool” type. Not the ditzy type, if those still exist), so I found this article intriguing.

The story, written by a variety of Vogue writers, provides a brief look at five NYC’s latest batch of socialites who are successful, charitable, and, of course, fashionable. I love the theme of red the creators used throughout the article. It gives the element of power, which makes the women all the more grand.

My favorite two are the two that get the biggest pictures on the mosaic below: Nieves ZuberbĂŒhler and Amy Sall.

Nieves is cool for a) her badass name and b) the fact she works at 60 Minutes and interviewed the last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor. How I want to be a fly on that wall! What makes her an extra level of cool is the ease she takes from casual  to over-the-top-glamorous. Halloween wedding with 900+ guests and a Brandon Maxwell wedding dress that is made of over 250 yards of chiffon? And not just any chiffon, but satin-faced chiffon? Girl, you know how to live it up.

I recognized Amy Sall from the pages of my J. Crew catalogs. My favorite aspect of her is the fact she was a former UN intern AND has a Master’s degree in human-rights studies from Columbia University. Her main focus according to Vogue is her work on the SUNU Journal, an outlet “centered on ideas of African cultural expression.” I looked up the journal on the interwebs and came across their website. Their home page has “Coming Soon” above the subscribe box, but fortunately they have a mission statement page, which you can find here. Amy Sall, overall, is graceful and fierce, and ready to take on the world of the socialites and the socially conscious.

(Read the full article to learn about the other Young Roses here http://www.vogue.com/article/new-generation-philanthropists-june-vogue-issue-cleo-wade-cecile-winckler)

“Tribute to Eric Theriot” Painting by Ramstedt

This beautiful painting before you is a touching tribute to artist Ramstedt’s friend, Eric Theirot.

Eric Theirot was born in Austin, Texas on New Year’s Day, 1995. He lived in Austin for 16 years before moving to North Carolina with his parents and three siblings. He graduated high school and went to the Univeristy of North Carolina – Charlotte. He graduated this past May with Honors, majoring in Computer Science. Two days after his graduation, he passed in a tragic car accident. Eric is a loved son, brother friend, and young man, whose bright future was cut short.

As mentioned earlier, Ramstedt created a lovely and touching piece of work to dedicate his friend’s life. The colors are vibrate and it is easy to tell they were a pair of great friends.

Ramstedt will be selling prints of the piece to help raise money for Eric’s family. You can message him on Facebook, or call him at +1 (512) 983-7860.

Please also help support the Theirot family by donating to their GoFundMe (https://www.gofundme.com/erictheriot). Their goal is to reach $20,000 to help pay for medical expenses, funeral expenses, etc.

Rest In Peace Eric Theirot.

Curtis Ramstedt

Curtis Ramstedt, local ATX artist and founder of Esplosivoism, is at it again! For those of you who don’t know Ramstedt or Esplosivoism, you are in for a treat as the two go hand in hand. Esplosivoism, in my mind, is taking a pound of Salvador Dali with a couple gallons of modern psychedelic strokes, a pinch of political statements and a whole lot of bold style. For a concrete definition from the founder himself, please read:

“Esplosivoism I describe as [the] pragmatic marraige between the modern and the classical. I use modern techniques such as emphasis on shape and bright color. I do have the same birthday as Henri Matisse [December 31st], but I also use philosophy, symbolism and Renaissance-esque themes like classical art.”

Ramstedt is taking the ATX by storm, even been recently featured in Gorrie’s Perspective.

(For my ol’ Your Way With Words followers, you may know this man by a different name with a different art skill: Curtis Des Marias, the poet. Remember “I, Sisyphus”? How about that villanelle, “Pour Ma Jolie”?)

***

The quirky man with a crazy sense of fashion and art has revealed his latest painting, “Catholica Scientiam”, one of the biggest projects he has undertaken. I at first thought it was multiple canvases that he cut up and glued together but boy was I wayyyyyyyy off. It’s a build-able canvas that makes a statement between Catholicism and science.

The cover. (Courtesy of Curtis Ramstedt)

I feel like I’m in 1970s galactic disco with a bunch of floating grapes (this is why I’m the writer/math in the group and not the art curator hahaha).

The right inside flap. (Courtesy of Curtis Ramstedt)

I feel like I’m on the border of three different dimensional wormhole portals. The contrast between the left and the right is quite significant. I wonder if he meant to put the creative side on the left and the logical, black/white side on the right to match the personalities of left-handed and right-handed people. I asked him and he had this to say:

“[It’s a] relation between culture and economic systems and human rights and scientific progress.”

Yep, I’m off. But that’s the joy of art. You can interpret it any way you like.

The inside (Courtesy of Curtis Ramstedt)

When you open it, the relation is made much more clear. Though I still feel like I’m in a fancy palace with naked pregnant lady that is being observed by a bunch of scientists.

***

Curtis Ramstedt is an interesting guy. He’s come a long way from his start in 2013. He is inspired by things in his life and, according to Ramstedt, the random “thoughts [he has] at the day…[his] brain never shuts off.”

“Jazz Party” – Ramstedt

Fun little fact: the girl in the paining is moi. Yes, moi. Back in 2014, Ramstedt was looking for something to paint and I told him to paint a jazz party. That was one of the last conversations we had for almost two and a half years (aka my “disappearing act”, a story for another day), so I didn’t get to see the painting until we reconnected in March. A few weeks later, I bought the painting. Don’t go criticizing or judging on vanity. You’d do the same. 😉

***

Want to see his art in person? You can check it out at the Kasbah Moroccan Lounge in West Campus.

Like what you saw? Follow/Like Ramstedt on Facebook. Post about it on your Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc. Make sure to use #ramstedt and #z&h when you share. 😀

Want to buy one of his pieces? Check out his website, http://ramstedt-art.com/. Please note he also does custom paintings.

Curtis Ramstedt. Once he’s in your life, no matter how hard you try to disappear, you can’t seem to get rid of him. He adds color to life with a stroke of a paintbrush…and a corny joke or two :).

 

April 21, 2017

Happy 2,770th birthday Rome! April 21, 753 BC is considered the traditional date Remus and Romulus founded the beautiful city. So to celebrate, enjoy this quote about the dreamy city of Roma.

Rome is the city of echoes, the city of illusions, and the city of yearning.

-Giootto di Bondone, Renaissance painter

Baroncelli Chapel - Giotto
Baroncelli Chapel

Poetry Games: The Clash

Some of my nerdier friends and I like to play this game in which we have to create a poem using song titles from a musician or band. Actually came up with this one using Clash songs two summers ago while wandering out the fancy chocolate section in the grocery store.

 

Oh you.

“Rudie can’t fail” we thought.

What a pitiful thought!

Rudie, if you are going to “Rock the Casbah”

As you get “Lost in the Supermarket” with “Janie Jones”

Then I shall ask you this “Should I Stay or Should I Go”?

“I Fought the Law” with “Police & Thieves”

by throwing “Spanish Bombs” at a “White Riot”

while driving my “Brand New Cadillac”.

Hurry up Rudie as the clock is ticking.

I’m trying to escape on a “Train in Vain”

to the Mother country because “London Calling”.

 

Note: I do not own any of these titles, so any party involved with Joe Strummer’s estate or The Clash in general: please don’t sue me.

The Fickle Things

We find that time
is a fickle thing.
We are actually
Quite, quite wrong.
What we don’t realize
is that we are
the fickle things.
We fear change
Yet we are
Constantly changing.
Growing, learning.
We support things,
places,
people.
Yet when the time comes,
We cut the chord,
Close the shop,
Disappear,
Hoping to never be seen again.

Time.
Time remains constant,
Always forward, never backward.
Always and forever there.
Time haunts us,
tempts us,
provokes us to return
to that place we once knew.
That place we now yearn.
Ironic, n’est-ce pas?

That place.
The sights of Jiffy 620s on display,
Of curiosities on shelves,
Of groovy artwork on faded walls.
The smells of cigars,
Of high quality coffee at low prices,
of home.
The sounds of laughter,
of love in bloom,
of philosophical talks and debates.
Now replaced by
the flashing of phone cameras,
modern and sleek boutiques,
the crowds of foreign folks.
Not a single familiar face in sight.

We find that time
is a fickle thing.
We are indeed
quite quite wrong.
The person you were then,
the person you yearn to be again,
the person you are now,
Are as strange as the places
themselves.
Not a single familiar face in sight.