#TBT: “She Received 65 Proposals, but Never Married” from NY Times

As I was listening to the hearing, I played around on the New York Times’ website. I know, I should have been doing my work but this was just too good.

I came across an article written in January 2017 by Lesley M. Blume. It’s a short piece on Mary London Baker, a socialite who throughout her life, as the title suggests, received 65 marriage proposals and denied every single one of them. Ironic how this is in the Weddings section of the paper.

She was known as the “shy bride” who denied her first fiance three times in the 1920s and then denied men 62 more times until her death in 1961. “Shy bride”? Really? Highly doubt that. In the article, it mentions that her father confessed Miss Mary was not shy at all but rather a party girl who like to tango with princes and travel the world.

It is interesting to see how her position and status cast her off from the typical role women played in the mid-twentieth century. Her father was a well-known (and very rich) financier, so she lived a very comfortable life. She refused marriage because she could. She didn’t need the support of a man to keep her social status among her fellow socialites or her pampered lifestyle. She was truly free to wander around, fool around and live life to the fullest.

Nowadays, it’s different. If a woman refuses to marry, it’s not because she’s some rich heiress who wants to travel the world and has the privilege (though they may be a few of those still around). A woman can refuse because she wants to focus on her career or because she does not like the idea of being tied down. She wouldn’t be refused by (most) social circles because of her choice. She’d be applauded. She wouldn’t be labeled as a “spinster”. She’d be labeled as a “modern woman”.

Or maybe I’m just stuck in my millennial mindset and trying to justify my choice to not get married anytime soon (or ever).  Hey I’m a busy girl with big plans. 🙂

What do you think? Comment below!

(Read the full article at https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/weddings/165-years-of-wedding-announcements/mary-landon-baker-shy-bride)

#ComeyHearing

I am not one for politics and told myself I would not involve Zelly & Ol Hem’s with political posts. This though, one can argue, isn’t necessarily about politics. It’s about history, live in the making.

One does not usually see a private citizen as a Senate hearing, but never say never. Ex-FBI Director James Comey, who served under three presidents in senior law enforcement positions, was fired by President Trump last month for possibly, though it’s looking more like “definitely” knowing too much about the Russian involvement in the 2016 US Presidential election.

Again, I am not political nor have a Political Science degree, but I am a history nerd. It’s been a long time since something with this scale of scandalous has caught the attention of the public.

There are many conspiracies wandering around if Trump silenced Comey prior to the hearing. Judging by Comey’s body language and his answers, he is providing his sincere honesty. His answers are a sigh of relief for it is clear cut and the truth, but at the same time troubling. Sure we won’t get the full, 100% information as he continuously mentions some topics should be saved for the classified hearing, but he isn’t giving BS. He’s providing everything he knows and even having a little fun as seen by his smiles when he and the Senate joke from time to time.

The whole thing is uneasy but sits well on the mind. It’s confusing but exciting and scary but full of bravery. I don’t know how else to explain it.

Watch the #ComeyHearing here with the New York Times.

Happy viewing and don’t forget to raise your cuvfefe glasses full of coffee (or vodka). Can’t wait until photos from the hearing circulate. Powerful images from a historic and troubling moment in time.

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Doug Mills, New York Times